Sunday, April 21, 2019

Under a Clear Black and White Sky


via

The night was neither dark nor stormy. If I am honest (and I am, I am, I am), the hourglass had just dripped noon. The midday sky was a clear shade of black and white, and my favorite park bench and I had felt no storm drop since last spring. Still… the air was thick and murky with the kind of weird that urges the eye and soul to search for chamber doors, to see if black birds or dismembered hands are knock, knock, knocking on the door.

“Knock, knock?”

“Who’s there?

“The Raven.”

“The Raven who?”

“The Ravenclaw who can’t answer your riddles for you. Because you alone know the why under your skirts or pants... the why behind two breasts or one. Also, this line of questioning can lead to lawsuit-land: Poe’s dead, but J.K. Rowling tweets.”

No dismembered knuckle has knocked on my door (this isn’t that kind of movie). But in the paper, the world burns… while chests and skulls (hearts and brains not always included) pray for the power to understand the art of blackout politricks.


the wee notes…

- this prose poem (although I am extremely tempted to call it “story-told poem”) contains the words hour, park, spring and power (from The Sunday Whirl). It was inspired by the photo above (from The Sunday Muse) and a bunch of other stuff.

-  linked to the Imaginary Garden with Real Toads, where Sanaa invites everyone to “Gather around for some ghost stories”.

- and, of course, I borrowed a word (or 3) from “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe, The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, and from the Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling. 

53 comments:

  1. I had hoped that this image might mean entirely different things to different people, and it seems to be so. "The Bell Jar" was one of the first novels I ever read outside of school, and it left an impression. Thanks so much for this twisty, thoughtful piece, M.

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    1. Thank you so much for the inspiration. I din't read The Bell Jar until I was an adult. I've loved it ever since.

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  2. I love "J.K. Rowling tweets" and the "politricks", a word aptly coined for our times.

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    1. I can't disagree... politricks everywhere, it seems.

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  3. I loved how you married all these different concepts from the past and present. Quite a bit of lateral thinking here. Loved it!

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  4. "The night was neither dark nor stormy. If I am honest (and I am, I am, I am), the hourglass had just dripped noon," these lines drew me in the moment I read them. There is a lot of courage and passion in this story-poem!❤️ Rowling would be jealous, Poe would approve and Sylvia.. well let's just say she would dedicate a whole bunch of poems to you! Happiest Monday, gorgeous 😘😘😘

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  5. I love the "the ravenclaw who cannot answer your riddles for you, for you alone know the why under your skirts or pants." Brilliant and wonderful and I think Sylvia is smiling in poetry heaven and probably Poe is too!!

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    1. Poe would probably grinning with more teeth than is cute, lol!

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  6. “The Ravenclaw who can’t answer your riddles for you. Because you alone know the why under your skirts or pants... the why behind two breasts or one. Also, this line of questioning can lead to lawsuit-land: Poe’s dead, but J.K. Rowling tweets.”

    Love this! It's brilliant.

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  7. ‘Story-told poem’ is a good way of describing this prose poem, Magaly, and I like the way you’ve combined a word prompt with a photo prompt, among other things. I love the monochrome setting, with the hourglass just dripped noon (Dali must have been very young then, an embryo even!), which is eerily atmospheric, with a conspiracy of raven humour and blackout politricks.

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    1. Your bit on Dali sounds like the beginning of a cool story.

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  8. thick and murky with the kind of weird that urges the eye and soul to search for chamber doors, to see if black birds or dismembered hands are knock, knock, knocking on the door ... oh delicious writing!!!!

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  9. I truly love it, and I love that image.
    As for me, I say that prose can damn well be poetry, especially when snarky ravens are involved. Snarky ravens can do whatever they like.

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  10. There aren't many directly stated answers under those black and white skies. But reading between the clouds seems to be a dying art (a byproduct of the missing heart, which would make us want to look deeper and a missing brain, which would drive us to understand). The ghosts hidden in those clouds could be people's consciences. I don't know if a Ravenclaw or Red Woman can bring those back.

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  11. The true horror is that there are no dismembered knuckles and yet, the knock on the door goes on. What a delicious write! I love your references and all that is borrowed has come out as unique and rich in your language. Great job, Magaly! :-)

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  12. nice combination of horror and comedy

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  13. Politricks! A word for our world. Good write.

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  14. Magaly, I'm glad I'm not the only one who has urges to go wild every now and then (read my Day 7 NaPoWriMo, I posted it late so no one here would be apt to read it) and follows those urges. I loved reading this just to see where it would lead. Of course also an insight into ...
    ..

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  15. Such a fun write! Stoey poem . I like that. Make up a new form. Go for it.

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  16. What everybody else said – and then some!

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  17. Oh, I love this. So many lines, too many lines to pick a favorite. Any time a raven visits a poem I'm all grins.

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    1. I also wrote for the photo at Black Ink Howl...It made no sense, but hey, why not? :)

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    2. Ravens make everything a bit better (for anything that isn't food).

      Hey, "why not?" seems like a great reason, every now and again.

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  18. politricks. what a perfect term ~

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  19. Ghost stories are a favorite and this was one was...oddly, for the type of the story...delightful and shivery at the same time. Also, I need to read The Bell Jar.

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    1. If you start the rereading soon, we'll be doing it together!

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  20. A dismembered knuckle knocking... interesting.

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  21. Magaly, there are days, which I feel conflicted, as the photo displayed, for this posting.

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    1. Here is hoping for the day where the only conflict is what to wear, and not whether or not one is feeling while wearing it.

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  22. Take your pick from either . . or both.
    Awesome
    Fabulous

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  23. Sorry to be late with this response. Life! I love, love, love the photo and the hourglass dripping noon. Such wonderful images, and ravens too. Spooky and inviting wide interpretation. Nice!

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    1. Thank you, Sarah! You're never later here. The doors are always open.

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If you write it with heart, I shall read it with soul.